Entire Florentine Codex Online For the first time, you can examine digital copies of the Florentine Codices, a series of books that were written by Anonymous Nahuas (anonymous for their protection) in Nahuatl while Fray Bernardino de Sahagun wrote the Spanish part. It is a copy of original source materials which are now lost, perhaps destroyed by the Spanish authorities who confiscated Sahagún's manuscripts. Created by a collaborative project between Fray Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar, and the indigenous Nahua, the name of the Aztec people, the Codextells of Nahua history, religious beliefs, and culture in their own l… This immense undertaking is the first complete translation into any language of Sahagún’s Nahuatl text, and represents one of the most distinguished contributions in the fields of anthropology, ethnography, and linguistics.Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library’s collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs’ lifeways and traditionsa rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. Santiago in the Americas, A Renaissance miniature in wood and feathers. One can’t help but wonder what old Bernardino might have thought of his books being put on this thing called the internet 500 years after he wrote them! Arthur J. O. Anderson (1907-1996) was an anthropologist specializing in Aztec culture and language. Bernardino de Sahagun’s General History of the Things of New Spain, also known as the Florentine Codex, is a monumental work dealing with the history of the Native American Aztec people of Mexico. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century.This introduction to the Florentine Codex contains the original prologues to each volume written by Bernadino de Sahagun, which detail his intentions and personal experiences in compiling the Codex. A long-predicted lord who had come to visit Moctezuma's state and who claimed some authority over it. The original source materials were records of conversations and interviews… Source: Excerpt from the Florentine Codex, an account of Aztec life originally written by Mexican natives between 1570-1585 under the supervision of Spanish friar Bernardino de Sahagún, whose primary goal was to convert the natives of Mexico to Christianity. 1 Historia General de las cosas de Nueva España "General History of the Things of New Spain", also called the Florentine Codex. Anderson and Charles Dibble, an important contribution to the scholarship on Mesoamerican ethno-history. General History of the Things of New Spain by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún: The Florentine Codex. A whole chapter of the cultural history of early Colonial Mexico is unfolding before us. According to The Florentine Codex, who did Moctezuma think that Cortés was? The English translation of the complete Nahuatl text of all twelve volumes of the Florentine Codex was a decades-long work of Arthur J.O. This lesson explores Sahagun's life, as well as the creation of the Codex. A digitized version of the codexhas been made available in its entirety by the World Digital Library. [The Codex is] an impressive monument to Spanish humanism in the sixteenth-century New World.”—The Hispanic American Historical Review, “Sahagún emerges as the indisputable founder of ethnographic science. Charles E. Dibble (1909-2002) was an anthropologist, linguist, and scholar specializing in Mesoamerican cultures. Nahuatl is the language of the Aztecs, and it is still spoken today by millions of people in Mexico. He received his master’s and doctorate degrees from the Universidad Nacional Autónomo de México and taught at the University of Utah from 1939-1978, where he became a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology. The Florentine Codex, or the Historia general de las cosas de nueva España (General History of the Things of New Spain), is a unique manuscript from the earliest years of Spanish dominance in the New World. On the occasion of the European Heritage Days (29-30 September 2007), the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana celebrates one of the most famous 16th-century codices in its collections, MS Med. Welcome our lords to this land.” Source: Excerpt from the Florentine Codex, an account of Aztec life originally written by Mexican natives between 1570-1585 under the supervision of Spanish friar Bernardino de Sahagún, whose primary goal was to convert the natives of Mexico to Christianity. Hispaniola’s early colonial art, an introduction, Prints and Printmakers in Colonial New Spain, Classical Architecture in Viceregal Mexico, Mission churches as theaters of conversion in New Spain, Murals from New Spain, San Agustín de Acolman, Atrial Cross, convento San Agustín de Acolman, mid-16th century, The Convento of San Nicolás de Tolentino, Actopan, Hidalgo, Bernardino de Sahagún and collaborators, Florentine Codex, Remembering the Toxcatl Massacre: The Beginning of the End of Aztec Supremacy, Engravings in Diego de Valadés’s Rhetorica Christiana, Mission Church, San Esteban del Rey, Acoma Pueblo, What does the music of heaven sound like?— St Cecilia in New Spain, Biombo with the Conquest of Mexico and View of Mexico City, Screen with the Siege of Belgrade and Hunting Scene (Brooklyn Biombo), The Virgin of the Macana and the Pueblo Revolution of 1680, Jerónimo de Balbás, Altar of the Kings (Altar de los Reyes), Cabrera, Portrait of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Casta paintings: constructing identity in Spanish colonial America, Spaniard and Indian Produce a Mestizo, attributed to Juan Rodriguez, Crowned Nun Portrait of Sor María de Guadalupe, Christ Crucified, a Hispano-Philippine ivory, Saintly violence? extraordinary encyclopedic project titled General History of the Things of New Spain, known as the Florentine Codex (1575–1577). You'll notice that the Florentine Codex at this link isn't something you can really read, unless of course you know both Spanish and Nahuatl. Our mission is to provide a free, world-class education to anyone, anywhere. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Culture in plague times: The Florentine Codex, an encyclopedia on Mesoamerican indigenous life, was created as Mexico was ravaged by smallpox The Aztecs actually referred to themselves as the Mexica, thence the name of the modern nation of Mexico. Who wrote it and for what purpose? Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (p. 8-9) and index. Florentine Codex << Florentine Codex, Book Vol. The Florentine Codex is a 16th century ethnographic research project in Mesoamerica by Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. Questions - Document B (1) Who wrote The Florentine Codex is a 16th-century ethnographic research project in Mesoamerica by Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún.Sahagún originally titled it: La Historia Universal de las Cosas de Nueva España (in English: the Universal History of the Things of New Spain). Donate or volunteer today! For their work on the Florentine Codex, both Dibble and Anderson received the Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest honor of the Mexican government; from the King of Spain the received the Order of Isabella the Catholic (Orden de Isabel la Católica) and the title of Commander (Comendador). Florentine Codex is the name given to 12 books created under the supervision of Bernardino de Sahagún between approximately 1540 and 1585. The plaque hangs in what was formerly the Colegio de la Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco, and is today the patio of the Secretariado de Relaciones … The creation of the Codex. If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. Both wrote their accounts decades after the meeting of Cortés and Moctezuma. Why is it so important? The accomplishments of the joint translators, Dibble and Anderson, will surely rank among the greatest achievements of American ethnohistorical scholarship.”—Natural History, The University of Utah Press J. Willard Marriott Library 295 South 1500 East, Suite 5400 Salt Lake City, UT 84112. Bernardino originally titled it: La Historia Universal de las Cosas de Nueva España (in English: the Universal History of the Things of New Spain).After a translation mistake it was given the name "Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España". Authors Dibble and Anderson dig into Sahagun’s past in “Sahagun’s Historia” and “Sahagun: Career and Character,” and discuss dating the Codex in “The Watermarks in the Florentine Codex.” This volume also includes indices of subject matter, persons and deities, and places for all twelve books. The Florentine Codex depicts Cortés' men disembarking from their ships. Florentine Codex. If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked. He was a curator of history and director of publications at the Museum of New Mexico in Santa Fe and taught at a number of institutions, including San Diego State University, from which he retired. During his first years in New Spain, Sahagún prepared for the creation of t… Khan Academy is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. He received his MA from Claremont College and his PhD in anthropology from the University of Southern California. Cover image: This plaque commemorates the collaboration between Bernardino de Sahagún and the indigenous scribes who together wrote the 12-volume Florentine Codex, the largest single source on ancestral native culture in Central Mexico. Florentine Codex: Introduction and Indices: Introductory Book (Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain) [de Sahagun, Bernardino, Anderson, Arthur J. O., Dibble, Charles E.] on Amazon.com. Sahagun is a Franciscan missionary who arrived in Mexico in 1529. Most impressive is the Florentine Codex, titled Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (General History of the Things of New Spain), prepared during approximately the last half of the 16th century by Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún and his Aztec students. The Florentine Codex has been the major source of Aztec life in the years before the Spanish conquest. Text the language of the Aztecs, Nahuatl, is located on the right side, and the Spanish translation of the left side of the manuscript. 218–20, containing the final version of the Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (“General History of the Things of New Spain”) by Bernardino de Sahagún (1499-1590) and commonly … General History of the Things of New Spain by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún: The Florentine Codex. The Codex has 1,200 pages and 2,468 painted illustrations. This version of the Códice Florentine is based on the version of the codex held in Florence as well as on the summary of the original codex, Primeros memorials, held in the Bibliioteca de Palacio, Madrid. The Florentine Codex is divided by subject area into twelve books and includes over 2,000 illustrations drawn by Nahua artists in the sixteenth century. The Florentine Codex is a primary source used by historians to help interpret the Conquest of the Americas. The Florentine Codex is the most impressive manuscript produced in the early modern Atlantic world. Sahagún’s preparation for the creation of the Florentine Codex began shortly after his arrival in 1529 to New Spain, an area that included modern-day Mexico, Central America, Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, the Phillippines, Florida, and most of the southwestern United States. After a translation mistake, it was given the name "Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España". The complete series of volumes is a landmark of scholarly achievement.”—The New Mexican, “This publication of Sahagún makes available to scholars and their students alike the original Nahuatl text for comparison with the more easily accessible Spanish text, which is in many places merely an abridgment or précis of the original. Book VIII: Kings and Lords. Palat. A viceroy (like a governor) ruled New Spain on behalf of the King of Spain. Florentine Codex is a set of 12 books created under the supervision of Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún between approximately 1540 and 1576. Sahagún’s preparation for the creation of the Florentine Codex began shortly after his arrival in 1529 to New Spain, an area that included modern-day Mexico, Central America, Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, the Philippines, Florida, and most of the southwestern United States. Tell us a little bit about the Florentine Codex. Compiled by Friar Bernardino de Sahagún and a group of Nahuatl, [mesoamerica native Indians including Aztec Indians], scholars between 1575 and 1577. Its 2,400 pages in 12 books,… The Florentine Codex is the common name given to a 16th century ethnographic research project in Mesoamerica by Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún.Bernardino originally titled it: La Historia General de las Cosas de Nueva Espana (in English: the General History of the Things of New Spain). In this edited A whole series of native sources for the study of Mexican pre-conquest history is now at hand for a field of historical study formerly restricted to a small number of investigators. (Florentine Codex… List of IllustrationsPrefacio by Miguel León-PortillaIntroductions by Arthur J. O. Anderson and Charles E. DibbleVariations of a Sahaguntine Theme by Arthur J. O. AndersonSahagún's Historia by Charles E. DibbleThe Watermarks in the Florentine Codex by Charles E. DibbleSahagún: Career and Character by Arthur J. O. AndersonSahagun's Prologues and Interpolations(translated from the Spanish by Charles E. Dibble):Book I: The Gods• Prologue• To the Sincere ReaderBook II: The Ceremonies• Prologue• To the Sincere Reader• Exclamation of the Author• Comment on the Sacred SongsBook III: The Origin of the Gods• PrologueBook IV: The Soothsayers• Prologue• To the Sincere ReaderBook V: The Omens• Prologue• Appendix PrologueBook VI: Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy• PrologueBook VII: The Sun, Moon, and Stars, and the Binding of the Years• Prologue• To the ReaderBook VIII: Kings and Lords• PrologueBook IX: The Merchants• PrologueBook X: The People• Prologue• Author's Account Worthy of Being NotedBook XI: Earthly Things• Prologue • To the Sincere Reader• Note• Note Also• Eighth Paragraph• MaizeBook XII: The Conquest• To the ReaderIndices compiled by Arthur J. O. AndersonSubject MatterPersons and DeitiesPlacesBibliography, “Highly recommended for all academic and large public libraries.”—Choice, “A great scholarly enterprise.”—New Mexico Historical Review, “Bringing the knowledge of modern scholarship to bear on their materials, the translators have been able to illuminate many obscurities in the text. Summary In this book, the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana celebrates one of the most famous 16th-century manuscripts in its collections, the "Historia general de las cosas de Nueva Espana" ('General History of the Things of New Spain') by Bernardino de Sahagun, commonly referred to as the Florentine Codex. Written between 1540 and 1585, the Florentine Codex (so named because the manuscript has been part of the Laurentian Library's collections since at least 1791) is the most authoritative statement we have of the Aztecs' lifeways and traditions-a rich and intimate yet panoramic view of a doomed people. This introduction to the Florentine Codex contains the original prologues to each volume written by Bernadino de Sahagun, which detail his intentions and personal experiences in compiling the Codex. Informed by Maya and other Indian peoples to the east of the capital of the great Aztec empire lying in the Central Mexican highlands, the Spaniards reached the coast of Veracruz on April 21, 1519. To log in and use all the features of Khan Academy, please enable JavaScript in your browser. Now housed in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence and bound in three lavishly illustrated volumes, the codex is a remarkable product of cultural exchange in the early Americas. Florentine Codex: Introduction and Indices: Introductory Book (Florentine Codex: General History of the Things of New Spain) Description. Bernardino de Sahagun's Florentine Codex is one of the richest historical sources on the language and culture of the Aztecs. 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